Pat Cummins makes no apologies for climate change hypocrisy, compares himself to Steve Jobs

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Pat Cummins refuses to back down from his crusade against climate change despite allegations of hypocrisy as the Australian cricket captain continues to polarize fans and influencers.

The 29-year-old superstar also slammed claims he was a key reason Cricket Australia did not renew its $40million sponsorship with energy giant Alinta.

The company supported the game’s governing body during its darkest times following the ball-tampering scandal in South Africa and the Tim Paine sexting drama, but will no longer be a partner.

Cummins is set to travel with the national team to India in the coming days for a brutal away tour

Pat Cummins has once again insisted that he will continue his crusade against climate change despite a wave of criticism from celebrities and fans of the game.

Cricket Australia insists that at no time did a conversation between men’s captain Pat Cummins and CA CEO Nick Hockley influence Alinta’s decision to complete his sponsorship deal in June 2023.

As Cummins and the Australian side prepare to embark on a daunting tour of India, which begins with a test on February 9, the skipper has once again added fuel to the fire of climate change.

Cummins said he would continue to share the beliefs he was passionate about and believed he “could make a difference”, before denying claims he was part of the $40million line of sponsorship.

He even oddly compared himself to the man many would consider one of the world’s greatest tech visionaries, Apple wiz Steve Jobs.

Pat Cummins, pictured wearing main sponsor Alinta Energy to his chest during the third Test against earlier this month, insists he had nothing to do with Cricket Australia not renewing its sponsorship of $40 million with the energy giant

Pat Cummins, pictured wearing main sponsor Alinta Energy to his chest during the third Test against earlier this month, insists he had nothing to do with Cricket Australia not renewing its sponsorship of $40 million with the energy giant

“It was (to be responsible for Alinta’s non-renewal of sponsorship) was pure nonsense. The nature of the position I’m in pulls you into different things,” he told the The telegraph of the day.

“I don’t do things to please everyone. Steve Jobs said he would sell ice cream if he wanted to.

It remains to be seen why Cummins believes his desire to share his views on climate change compares to the man who revolutionized the computer industry and life as we know it with the iPhone.

Either way, it’s clear he won’t stop pushing for what he thinks is right.

That’s despite Daily Mail Australia highlighting last year that he was driving a gas-guzzling Range Rover worth well over $100,000.

In 2020, the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy ranked Range Rovers as one of the 12 greenest vehicles on the road due to their carbon emissions.

Cummins flies first class all over the world, despite a 2013 World Bank study which found that the carbon footprint of first class air passengers was up to seven times greater than that of economy class passengers.

He also has a partnership with a Chinese solar energy company, Longi, which is involved in forced labor.

Apart from his $2 million a year deal with Cricket Australia, Cummins has long been a corporate darling and his net worth is estimated at $63 million.

He insists no one “is perfect” despite the means to make what would be an incredibly easy switch to a car with far less carbon footprint.

Cummins (pictured in December 2021) was pictured driving a Range Rover, considered one of the world's worst pollution SUVs

Cummins (pictured in December 2021) was pictured driving a Range Rover, considered one of the world’s worst pollution SUVs

Cummins has been pictured enjoying the benefits of flying first class before and is seen here testing business class beds on a Qantas A380.  Flying at the front of the plane has a carbon footprint seven times larger than saving, according to a 2013 World Bank study

Cummins has been pictured enjoying the benefits of flying first class before and is seen here testing business class beds on a Qantas A380. Flying at the front of the plane has a carbon footprint seven times larger than saving, according to a 2013 World Bank study

Cummins says his generation “can’t leave values ​​at the door.”

“Just because nobody’s going to be absolutely perfect doesn’t mean we all throw our hands together and explode,” he said.

“If you start from the starting point that maybe we can all do one thing a little bit better, that’s a good thing.

“I don’t think I’m shouting it from the rooftops. I just try to do a lot myself to make small changes in my life if I can.

“If I can make a small difference through my actions or Cricket for Climate, I’m not too bothered by people putting holes in it.”

Pat Cummins (pictured with wife Becky at the recent launch of the Australian side's The Test documentary) stands firm despite his climate change advocacy, sparking a storm of controversy

Pat Cummins (pictured with wife Becky at the recent launch of the Australian side’s The Test documentary) stands firm despite his climate change advocacy, sparking a storm of controversy

Some cricket fans would prefer him to focus on the game rather than marketing and PR.

Others believe that climate change is the most pressing issue facing the world today, and strong advocates for reducing emissions should do whatever they can to try to make a difference.

That’s not the only controversial sociopolitical issue that Cummins wanted to highlight.

Amid fierce debate over whether Australia Day should be celebrated on January 26 and whether cricket should be played, Cummins also threw his support behind Indigenous star Ash Gardner.

Gardner, the world’s No.1-ranked all-around player, is preparing to play with Australia’s women’s team against Pakistan on National Day but said it “didn’t suit her”.

Indigenous star Ash Gardner recently revealed that the authorities' decision to schedule a game on Australia Day

Indigenous star Ash Gardner recently revealed that the authorities’ decision to schedule a game on Australia Day ‘didn’t suit him’

“As a proud Muruwari woman and reflecting on what January 26th means to me and my people, it is a day of pain and mourning,” she posted on social media on Sunday.

“For those who do not fully understand what this day means, it was the beginning of genocide, massacres and dispossession.

“Unfortunately this year the Australian women’s cricket team are scheduled to play a match on January 26 which is certainly not good enough for me as an individual but also for everyone I represent,” Gardner wrote.

Cummins has thrown his support behind the Australian star as the debate swirls ahead of Thursday’s holiday.

‘I feel for Ash. It is a difficult situation. It’s a tough day for many in Australia,” he said.

Pat Cummins, pictured wearing the Australian Aboriginal-inspired shirt at the T20 World Cup last year, said he felt for Ash Gardner about his Australia Day stance

Pat Cummins, pictured wearing the Australian Aboriginal-inspired shirt at the T20 World Cup last year, said he felt for Ash Gardner about his Australia Day stance

It comes as Indigenous male star Dan Christian applauded Gardner’s bravery amid a flurry of controversy and racist responses on social media.

“Bravo Ash Gardner for using your platform as an Australian cricketer and proud Aboriginal woman, to promote conversation in the hope that our MPs can make meaningful improvements to the systemic and cyclical issues affecting our people. ” Changing the date can be a start,’ Christian wrote on social media.

The Australian women will face Pakistan in the second game of a three-game Australia Day series in Hobart, while Cummins and his men will travel to India with just seven days of preparation on the subcontinent before the first test on February 9.