Pat Cash: Novak Djokovic is one misstep away from hamstring injury ruining his Australian Open

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Pat Cash and top doctor say Novak Djokovic is ‘one faux pas’ away from having his Australian Open ruined by a hamstring injury he was accused of faking

  • Pat Cash and Dr Peter Larkins think star’s injury is cause for concern
  • Larkins says Djokovic is ‘one step away’ from serious trouble
  • The Serbian superstar has been accused by some of faking the injury

Australian tennis legend Pat Cash and a top doctor agree that Novak Djokovic’s hamstring injury is very serious – and ‘one misstep’ could ruin the Serbian superstar’s tournament.

The nine-time champion told the media on Monday night he was being criticized for the leg problems he was suffering from and angrily denied exaggerating the extent of the injury.

Australian tennis legend Pat Cash and top doctor agree Novak Djokovic’s hamstring injury is very serious – and ‘one misstep’ could ruin the Serbian superstar’s tournament

The nine-time champion told the media on Monday night he was being criticized for the leg problems he was suffering from and angrily denied he had exaggerated the extent of the injury.

The nine-time champion told the media on Monday night he was being criticized for the leg problems he was suffering from and angrily denied he had exaggerated the extent of the injury.

Djokovic’s hamstrings were bandaged throughout the tournament, although there were no signs of ill effect in his recent performance against Australian Alex de Minaur.

Cash and sports medicine professional Dr. Peter Larkins thinks the hamstrings are definitely on the mend, but it wouldn’t take much to derail Djokovic.

“Just a weird move and if you’re on the wrong foot or rushing, and it hasn’t completely healed 100%, there’s a risk,” Cash said.

Australian tennis icon Pat Cash (pictured) and sports medicine professional Dr Peter Larkins believe the hamstrings are definitely on the mend, but it wouldn't take much to derail Djokovic

Australian tennis icon Pat Cash (pictured) and sports medicine professional Dr Peter Larkins believe the hamstrings are definitely on the mend, but it wouldn’t take much to derail Djokovic

“There’s no doubt that he might do something in the next few matches. It might be a weird move and he might stop and that would be the end of his tournament, unless it’s in the final and he’s gone. he fights.

Dr Larkins agreed the 35-year-old star needed to be careful with his movements on the pitch.

“I absolutely give him the benefit of the doubt and have no doubt that this is real. There’s probably some low-level hamstring awareness there. It could be nerve related,” he said.

Dr Larkins said the 35-year-old star had to be careful with his movements on the pitch

Dr Larkins said the 35-year-old star had to be careful with his movements on the pitch

“He’s probably so finely tuned to his body that even the smallest thing will be something he’s aware of. But he’s still one step away from doing something more serious.

Cash believes Djokovic’s commitment to recovering when he’s not on the pitch is his secret to dealing with the immense stress the world No. 4 is putting on his body.

“What Novak does, and it’s well known, is he goes into a hyperbaric chamber. And that will help with healing. It’s just really smart,’ Cash said.

“He tries all kinds of different things. He is always exploring, trying different things, finding solutions to help him recover. He just puts in the hours and recovers.

Cash believes Djokovic's commitment to recovering when he's not on the pitch is his secret to dealing with the immense stress the world No. 4 is putting on his body.

Cash believes Djokovic’s commitment to recovering when he’s not on the pitch is his secret to dealing with the immense stress the world No. 4 is putting on his body.

“It’s partly genetic. Light-bodied players can bounce back a bit, but he just goes the extra mile and he has a better chance of recovering from things.

Djokovic was backed by former two-time Australian Open winner Victoria Azarenka, who recalled being cross-examined about her rib injury which prompted her 10-minute half stoppage -final of the Australian Open in 2013.

“It was one of the worst things I’ve ever experienced in my professional career, the way I was treated after that moment, the way I had to explain myself until 10:30 p.m. at night because people didn’t want to believe me.” Azarenka said after his game on Tuesday night.

Djokovic was backed by former two-time Australian Open winner Victoria Azarenka, who recalled being cross-examined about her rib injury which caused her to stop 10 minutes in half -final of the Australian Open in 2013 (photo).

Djokovic was backed by former two-time Australian Open winner Victoria Azarenka, who recalled being cross-examined about her rib injury which caused her to stop 10 minutes in half -final of the Australian Open in 2013 (photo).

“I can actually echo what Novak said the other day. There’s sometimes, I don’t know, an incredible desire for a villain and a hero story that needs to be written.

“But we’re not villains, we’re not heroes, we’re ordinary human beings going through so much. The assumptions and judgments, all that commentary, it’s just crap because nobody’s here to see the whole story. No matter how many times I told my story, it didn’t work.

Djokovic will face Andrey Rublev in the quarterfinals of the Australian Open on Wednesday.