Keir Starmer sides with Nicola Sturgeon on Scottish Gender Act

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Keir Starmer sides with Nicola Sturgeon on gender law as spokesman says there’s nothing in Scottish reforms that threatens single-sex spaces

  • Sir Keir said he saw nothing that would threaten single-sex spaces in the bill
  • Labor has asked the government to urgently share its legal advice with them
  • The government has said Scottish reform will threaten equality laws in the UK
  • He plans to use the Act under Section 35 to veto change in the Scottish Parliament

Sir Keir Starmer has sided with Nicola Sturgeon on sweeping gender reforms in Scotland.

He opposes Westminster using its ultimate veto to block the SNP Government’s controversial plan to let people as young as 16 change their legal gender.

The Labor leader does not believe single-sex spaces are put at risk by making it easier for anyone to change gender, and his spokesperson would like fail to condemn party MPs who barracked a colleague while she stood up for women’s rights during a heated debate in the House of Commons on Tuesday.

Ministers say they were forced to take the unprecedented step of vetoing legislation passed by the Scottish Parliament because the Gender Recognition Reform (Scotland) Bill would have had an “impact serious negative” on equality laws across the UK.

Nicola Sturgeon’s new government reform would allow people as young as 16 to legally change their sex

Sir Keir's spokesman said the UK and Scottish governments could have resolved the line

Sir Keir’s spokesman said the UK and Scottish governments could have resolved the ‘totally unnecessary’ line before the unprecedented Article 35 veto was issued and he could point to nothing in the Scottish reforms which posed a threat to single-sex spaces.

In a further blow to Scotland’s First Minister, former Supreme Court Justice Lord Hope yesterday said the Government’s reasons were ‘devastating’ and that Miss Sturgeon’s chances of winning a legal challenge were ‘very slim’.

But Sir Keir’s spokesman said the UK and Scottish governments could have resolved the ‘totally unnecessary’ row before the unprecedented Article 35 veto was issued and he could point to nothing in Scottish reforms that posed a threat to single-sex spaces.

“That’s why we want to see legal advice to see if there’s anything the government is saying that we don’t know why they’re taking this unprecedented step of using the section 35 mechanism to block legislation. “, did he declare. .

Members of the Labor Party and the SNP have been described as

Labor and SNP members were described as ‘shouting’ Rosie Duffield, Labor MP’s gender critic, during a heated debate on the issue in the House of Commons on Tuesday.

The spokesman said on Twitter that there would be only ‘minimal’ difficulties in processing benefits for those registered as one sex in Scotland and the other in England, and the ‘vast majority’ of 500 expected new applications for a gender recognition certificate would be genuine, sincere.

He admitted that single-sex groups would not be allowed to refuse entry to anyone with a gender recognition certificate, but said that was already the case.

The spokesman said his Labor counterpart Lord Falconer, a former Lord Chancellor close to Sir Keir, had also dismissed the government’s objections.

During Tuesday’s debate in the House of Commons, male Labor MPs accused their colleague Rosie Duffield of suggesting that allowing biological men into single-sex spaces such as “domestic violence settings, changing rooms and prisons” would have “serious repercussions on women”.

Asked if Sir Keir found it acceptable for her to be shouted at, his spokesman said: ‘There is always vigorous debate in the House of Commons, but that should never cross the line of abuse.’ If a member feels this has happened, then clearly that is not correct.

Senior Labor Party leader Emily Thornberry denied that Miss Duffield had been shouted at by MP Lloyd Russell-Moyle. “I think I heard Lloyd say, ‘Oh, Rosie, that’s not right’, but I don’t think that would probably be someone yelling,” she told Times Radio.

Miss Duffield herself yesterday said she was not supported by the party leadership in the face of abuse. “I haven’t heard from Keir,” she said. ‘Shadow cabinet members don’t approach me to ask if I’m okay or what they can do and they don’t discuss this issue with me,’ she told GB News.

Mr Russell-Moyle apologized for the ‘tone’ of his remarks to a Tory MP he had accused of transphobia – but did not say sorry to Miss Duffield.