Hunt for Hitler’s lost £200m gold turns Nazi! Row breaks out between treasure hunters and historians

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An argument has broken out between treasure hunters looking for Nazi gold and historical experts who say they are looking in the wrong place.

Since last September, a group called the Silesian Bridge Foundation has been excavating the grounds of an 18th-century palace in the Polish village of Minkowskie, where they say £200 million worth of Nazi gold and other valuables used by Himmler’s SS are stolen, are hidden.

The excavation of an old orangery on the palace grounds came about after the foundation said its location had been revealed in a war diary written by an SS officer at the end of World War II.

But now historians (pictured) who “invited the foundation to verify the diary” say their analysis is “not entirely positive.”

The diary would describe the hiding places of treasures intended for the creation of a Fourth Reich to continue the war.

But now historians whom the foundation “invited to verify the diary” say their analysis is “not entirely positive.”

The historians from a group called the Discoverer Magazine Exploration Group (GEMO) said on Facebook: ‘Our main finding is that the village of Minkowskie is NOT mentioned in the ‘War Diary’.

“This could be difficult for the Foundation, as it is the only place where excavation work is being carried out at the moment.”

The dig at an old orangery on the palace grounds was sparked after the foundation said its location was revealed in a war diary (pictured) written by an SS officer at the end of World War II

The dig at an old orangery on the palace grounds was sparked after the foundation said its location was revealed in a war diary (pictured) written by an SS officer at the end of World War II

The dig at an old orangery on the palace grounds was sparked after the foundation said its location was revealed in a war diary (pictured) written by an SS officer at the end of World War II

Since last September, a group called the Silesian Bridge Foundation has been excavating the grounds of an 18th-century palace in the Polish village of Minkowskie (pictured), where they believe £200 million worth of Nazi gold, gold and other valuables were found. stolen from Himmler by the SS are hidden.

Since last September, a group called the Silesian Bridge Foundation has been excavating the grounds of an 18th-century palace in the Polish village of Minkowskie (pictured), where they believe £200 million worth of Nazi gold, gold and other valuables were found. stolen from Himmler by the SS are hidden.

Since last September, a group called the Silesian Bridge Foundation has been excavating the grounds of an 18th-century palace in the Polish village of Minkowskie (pictured), where they believe £200 million worth of Nazi gold, gold and other valuables were found. stolen from Himmler by the SS are hidden.

According to legend, the treasure was stored in police headquarters and packed in crates before being transported under SS guard from Breslau, in what is now the Polish city of Wrocław, to Hirschberg, today’s Jelenia Góra, and the Sudeten Mountains.

Soon after, the trail fell dead, and the gold has never been seen or heard from since.

Dubbed the ‘Gold of Breslau’, the hoard is said to also contain jewelry and valuables from the private collections of wealthy Germans living in the region who handed over their belongings to the SS to protect them from looting by the advancing Red Army.

The historians also analyzed a letter that came with the ‘War Diary’. The Foundation claimed that the letter was written by a senior SS officer to one of the girls who worked at the palace and who later became his lover.

The diary would describe the hiding places of treasures intended for the creation of a Fourth Reich to continue the war. But now historians whom the foundation “invited to verify the diary” say their analysis is “not entirely positive.”

The excavation is taking place on the grounds of the 18th-century palace in the village of Minkowskie, Poland

The excavation is taking place on the grounds of the 18th-century palace in the village of Minkowskie, Poland

The excavation is taking place on the grounds of the 18th-century palace in the village of Minkowskie, Poland

The officer wrote: ‘Dear Inge, I will fulfill my assignment, with God’s will. Some transports were successful.

‘I hereby entrust you with the remaining 48 heavy Reichsbank chests and all the family chests.

“Only you know where they are. May God help you and me, fulfill my mission.’

But the historians who examined the documents have now also questioned the authenticity of the letter.

They said, “Also the accompanying documents, such as a famous letter, don’t seem very ‘legitimate’ and are NOT part of the ‘War Diary’, meaning there isn’t even the slightest bit of evidence that there is anything in Minkowskie.”

The Silesian Bridge Foundation responded by saying: ‘Documents of that age and type leave a lot of room for interpretation, we are aware of that.

It is our belief that War Diary will always defend itself.

“We are very confident and that is why we have welcomed your team and are open to other experts as well.

‘Thank you!’

The location was revealed through secret documents, a diary (pictured) and a map that the treasure hunters received from the descendants of SS officers who belonged to a secret lodge worshiped by Himmler and dated back over 1,000 years.

The location was revealed through secret documents, a diary (pictured) and a map that the treasure hunters received from the descendants of SS officers who belonged to a secret lodge worshiped by Himmler and dated back over 1,000 years.

The location was revealed through secret documents, a diary (pictured) and a map that the treasure hunters received from the descendants of SS officers who belonged to a secret lodge worshiped by Himmler and dated back over 1,000 years.

The setback for the treasure hunters comes after they say Nazi descendants handed over another letter, written by an SS officer who they believe may uncover another lost treasure.

The Foundation said the fragment of an aging letter, seen exclusively by MailOnline, could reveal the mystery behind one of World War II’s most valuable pieces of looted art.

The letter refers to the long-lost 16th-century painting Portrait of a Young Man by Italian artist Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino, better known as Raphael, which was seized by Gestapo officers after the German invasion of Poland in 1939.

The Foundation said it received the letter from the descendants of high-ranking Nazis who now want to atone for the crimes committed by Nazi Germany during the war.

In the letter, the SS officer mentions Raphael’s 16th-century painting, which came into the hands of Hitler’s accomplice Hans Frank, head of government in occupied Poland.

The painting, along with other priceless works of art, hung in the Wawel Castle in Krakow, which Frank had claimed as his home.

This was the last place the painting – currently valued at over £86 million – was seen.

The setback for the treasure hunters comes after they said Nazi descendants handed over another letter written by an SS officer who could discover another lost treasure

The setback for the treasure hunters comes after they said Nazi descendants handed over another letter written by an SS officer who could discover another lost treasure

The setback for the treasure hunters comes after they said Nazi descendants handed over another letter written by an SS officer who could discover another lost treasure

Now the five-page letter, written in Gothic German by a Nazi officer named “Michaelis,” could explain its disappearance.

In the 1947 letter – apparently addressed to a friend – Michaelis writes that he had hidden the painting along with other valuables.

He also mentioned someone named Hanke, who is believed to be Karl Hanke, the Gauleiter of Lower Silesia and later the last Reichsführer-SS after Heinrich Himmler was arrested in April 1944.

In the letter, Michaelis wrote, “Yes, Hanke was right, the boxes contain Kraków cultural goods.

‘When I think back, it was once a collection [belonging to] Flames.

“You know, my dear friend, I love culture, but this was too much for me.

‘Raphael’s Portrait of a Young Man with Old Postage Stamps on the Back, Oval and Square, Signed 1514.’

While it is unclear where the SS officer hid the painting, Bart Zelaytys of the Silesian Bridge Foundation said: ‘This is the first written document that tells us at least in part what happened to the painting after it left Krakow.

“Finding the lost Raphael would be the greatest sensation in the art world since the end of the war.”