American Girl accused of ‘stripping away innocence’ with book that teaches girls to change gender

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Popular doll brand American Girl is facing backlash for a recent book that appears to be forcing children to change their gender

Popular doll brand American Girl is facing backlash for a recent book that appears to be forcing children to change their gender

Popular doll brand American Girl is facing backlash for prompting children to change their gender in a recent book marketed to young girls.

The recently released book, titled A Smart Girl’s Guide: Body Image, contains lines of advice for prepubescent youth on how to change their gender — seemingly without their guardian’s blessing.

Parents have since deemed the book’s contents “misleading and dangerous,” citing the messages it appears to be sending to the impressionable demographic.

The 96-page manual – billed as a “guide” – is marketed to girls ages 3 to 12 and teaches them how to make permanent changes to their bodies and embrace the fact that they can be unhappy with the body they’re with born. .

The book, written by American Girl author Mel Hammond, is currently available in stores across the country and on the company’s website.

The release comes amid a flurry of ever-awakening dollmaker content.

It is earlier this year parent company recently launched a transgender Barbie doll. Before that, American Girl, which sells more than 30 million dolls a year, shilled an Asian doll as anti-Asian hate crimes in the US soared.

The company has not yet commented on the contentious content.

The 96-page handbook is marketed to girls ages 3 to 12 and teaches them how to make permanent changes to their bodies — seemingly behind their parents' backs

The 96-page handbook is marketed to girls ages 3 to 12 and teaches them how to make permanent changes to their bodies — seemingly behind their parents' backs

The 96-page handbook is marketed to girls ages 3 to 12 and teaches them how to make permanent changes to their bodies — seemingly behind their parents’ backs

“Parts of your body may make you feel uncomfortable and you may want to change the way you look,” reads an excerpt deemed problematic by parents online, before claiming “That’s totally okay!”

It further advises children, “You can appreciate your body for everything it lets you experience and still want to change certain things about it.”

On the very same page, the book promotes the use of puberty blockers, telling girls to see their doctor if they feel confused about their gender but are not physically ready to undergo hormone therapy.

The book advises, “If you haven’t gone through puberty yet, the doctor may offer medication to delay the changes in your body, giving you more time to think about your gender identity.”

The book goes on to tell readers that “if you don’t have an adult you trust, there are organizations all over the country that can help you. For more information, see the resources on page 95.”

Parents have since expressed outrage at the contents of the book, with one mom saying it’s pretending to be just another educational companion to convey a tween girl’deceptive and dangerous’ messages that convince girls to question their bodies.

She added that the company is “taking away all innocence” with the contents of the book.

The book tells young readers that “if you don't have an adult you trust, there are organizations all over the country that can help you.  For more information, see the resources on page 95'

The book tells young readers that “if you don't have an adult you trust, there are organizations all over the country that can help you.  For more information, see the resources on page 95'

The book tells young readers that “if you don’t have an adult you trust, there are organizations all over the country that can help you. For more information, see the resources on page 95′

Meanwhile, the book’s regular writer and editor graduated from college in 2014 and mentions on her website that some of her “favorite things are trees, rainbows, and dairy-free ice cream.”

Hammond, who lists her pronouns as “she/her” on her LinkedIn profile, started working for the company in 2019, holding only one job at a small software company in her hometown of Wisconsin.

In her biography, she writes that she enjoys working at American Girl, which is also based in Wisconsin, citing how “last year for my birthday my co-workers bought me a two pound tub of rainbow marshmallows – which I named Marsh ‘.

The author – whose body of work includes the book in question and two other books written over the past two years – received her master’s degree in children’s literature from Kansas State, where she says she “studied misplaced and gigantic food in picture books.”

DailyMail.com has reached out to American Girl for comment.

Parents have since expressed outrage at the contents of the book, with one mother saying it uses the disguise of being just another educational companion for a tween girl to convey “misleading and dangerous” messages that convince girls to doubting the body.